Amateur Films in Important Ways

 

Idea without action is a daydream; action without idea is a nightmare. Adapted from a Japanese proverb this captures that while ideas are not sufficient to achieve acknowledged standards of film-making, the action itself without a link to a clear, chain-linked motives often leads to failure of film-makers to realise their potential. I pose that this is the case of Malta. Despite the genuine and continuous attempts to trigger-off our domestic film industry these were solely experiences of disappointments.

In order to ensure that the path from idea to action is coherent, a film-maker needs to experience a three-stage process described by looking at, listening to, and learning from previous amateurs.

Here’s the problem: the lack of coherence between what one envisions and what s/he does, bring ineffectiveness since it creates confusion in the minds of the film-makers themselves and the audience. The smallness of the market, if it exists at all, specifically necessitates effective leadership in this area; therefore the need for amateur film-makers.

In order to ensure that the path from idea to action is coherent, a film-maker needs to experience a three-stage process described by looking at, listening to, and learning from how previous amateurs transform the limits they bounded and developed projects based on their needs.

I can explain this by citing a direct quote from Wikipedia:

As an employee of the Video Archives, a now-defunct video rental store in Manhattan Beach, he and fellow movie enthusiasts, including Roger Avary, discussed cinema and customer video recommendations at length. He paid close attention to the types of films people liked to rent and has cited that experience as inspiration for his directorial career. He has been quoted as saying, "When people ask me if I went to film school I tell them, 'no, I went to films.’”

Any guess who is he?